From today’s Herald:

Radio broadcaster Alan Jones has apologised for causing offence over his on-air treatment of Opera House chief executive Louise Herron.

To Louise and those people who’ve been offended, I apologise,” Jones said on his morning 2GB breakfast program on Tuesday.

Radio broadcaster Alan Jones has apologised for causing offence over his on-air treatment of Opera House chief executive Louise Herron.

“As I said earlier, I’ll be writing to Louise later today and indicate those very same sentiments.”

Jones said he did not believe his behaviour towards Ms Herron was bullying, but acknowledged there were people who did.

We won’t know what’s in the letter unless it is released, but if it utters words similar to “if you’ve been offended” then it is not an apology.

An apology is when you own the error, grab both sides of the sh%t sandwich and take the biggest bit you can. And eat every damn crumb. For the apology to be sincere, it need an element of humility. Does anyone think Jones will be humbled by this experience?

Thought so.

What is beautiful about this story is that it runs below an ad for … the Everest.

So for all the huffing by columnists in the Herald and the blah blah, they took the money.

If the SMH was so angered by the race, and by what it represents (gauche commercialism over substance and perpetuation of the gambling culture) it would not only decide not to cover the race which no one cares about anyway but the paper would also decide to walk away from all racing coverage to which gambling is attached.

Similar to the ABC, it should also not mention stadium names associated with gambling. Only when the industry is shunned will their words be meaningful.

But words are cheap.

Which brings us back to Jones.

The second element of an apology is what it represents to the future. An apology is a line in the sand. To the person you have wronged, you are making a commitment to try to change your behaviour. With forgiveness comes th commitment to try to do better.

If the outrages really want to make a difference, here’s what they would do: stop going on the Jones show.

Jones is very popular, but Jones is only half the program. Actually, he’s about 25 per cent. Half the how is ads. For funeral homes and superannuation. The remaining 25 per cent is a guest (more or less – usually a lot less with jones talking over them and yelling). The content of the show comes form Jones asking questions. He needs guests.

Forget tareting advertisers to hurt Jones. People need to stop going on his show. It would last about a week. Then the lesson about manners will be learned.

But remember, Jones has a lot of form. Even with guests he agrees with (audio at 2:20).

 

So while Jones may be eating the sandwich today, it won’t be his last trip to the baker.